"Contrary to the opinions of many neophyte musicians, managers are not a "get rich quick" scheme.  If you are approached by a manager, you have not hit the lottery.  You have been noticed by someone who can help you navigate your career in an unusually challenging and fickle industry.  You don't get rich without a tremendous amount of hard work, managed or otherwise."

"If you don't design your own artistic career plan, or if you fail to enlist someone reputable and experienced to co-create one with you, chances are you'll just arbitrarily fall inside the scope of some other musician's career plan, or maybe randomly leak inside the scope of some executive's plan; and guess what those people will have planned out just for you?  Not much.  If you solely rely on others to create your career, the likelihood of a win on your part is utterly nonexistent."

"In this current climate, all commercial musicians/recording artists are required to create their own careers from the ground up. Gone are the days where one waited to be discovered and groomed, then handed resources and opportunities just for being in the right place at the right time. Many musicians still wait for that magic romantic moment, and unfortunately, they will have dreams that never come true. The artists that work their music careers like a full-time job, the ones that push and sweat and sacrifice, those are the only ones that will have a real shot at that dream."

"Music publicist Howard Bloom once wrote: 'I used to tell my superstars that you don't just owe your audience your songs, you owe them your life.  Why?  Because others find themselves through you.  Others make you an icon, a symbol that stands for something special, for some essential aspect of themselves.'  For those that are fortunate enough to realize fame as part of their musical careers, truer words have never been spoken."

“When meeting an industry professional for the first time, often times a new artist will misstep by trying to describe their music rather than simply sharing a sonic sample.  Industry professionals don’t need to hear how you believe your music sounds, at least not during an introductiory exchange.  So, don’t try to explain where you fit in the musical landscape.  Hand them a download card and always let the music do the talking.”

"For the artist who gets impatient with the pace of his/her career growth and wonders why it's not happening overnight, I say this:  It takes six months to build a Rolls Royce, but it only takes twelve hours to build a Toyota."

"To the musician who feels entitled and distinctly above the long, hard process of developing a real career - the artist who will blame everyone else for their lack of success - I say this:  No one cares about your excuses or pities your procrastination.  No one will coddle you because you are lazy.  It's your ass.  You move it."

“Few musicians would ever admit that they are apathetic about their careers.  They think they work too hard on the songs and recordings and performances to ever be accused of not caring about their work.  But from a business perspective, any lack of engagement in promoting and marketing one’s own career is not only considered apathetic, it has been historically proven to be a debilitating factor for everyone else that is involved.  Simply said, if artists don’t actively participate in their career development outside of writing, recording, and performing, then they (and those supporting them) are destined to fail.”

"Working relationships between all artists and their managers are as different as the parties that enter into them, so it would be quite impossible to create a universal list of what every manager’s specific duties are.  However, I believe that there are eight fundamental roles every manager should be prepared to play on behalf of his or her artists - and they are (in no particular order):  1.  a Career Advisor  2.  an Unwavering Advocate  3.  an Industry Mentor  4.  an Effective Spokesperson  5. a Trusted Confidant  6.  an Efficient Facilitator  7.  a Chief Strategist,  and 8.  a Relationship Broker."

"The fear of achieving one's career aspirations can be as debilitating as the fear of never reaching them at all.  Commonly, when an enviable yet unfamiliar opportunity presents itself, an emerging artist will be self-sabotaged by a paralyzing wave of anxiety.  Artists that ultimately develop sustainable careers don't necessarily eliminate their fears - they simply learn how to push through them.  Look at any chart-topping artist and you can safely assume that they became a successful working musician in part because they have already arrived on the other side of fear."

"The new music industry model requires professional musicians to be adept at fan engagement in order to succeed and sustain.  But there is one undeniable rule to the process:  Ongoing fan engagement must be every bit as genuine as the music that introduced that fan to the artist in the first place."

"Being very talented is not enough.  It never has been.  It never will be.  The artist must also exhibit certain character traits (drive, determination, and bravery are a great place to start) if the ultimate goal is to make music his or her livelihood."

"Many times once an artist has a booking agent, a manager, or a record label in place, they believe that there is actually less work for them. That is never the case. The stakes are higher than ever before.  Every artist must participate in their careers daily, regardless of how many people or business entities are actually assisting them."

“After crafting his design, an architect will employ and direct a team of experts - designers, contractors, laborers, and craftsmen - to help realize his vision and complete his project.  Similarly, the successful artist manager must be the architect for his client's career, managing not only the artist’s day to day objectives, but also guiding the ongoing agendas of all professional entities involved to ensure cohesive and congruent focus until the desired results are achieved.”

“Despite what some creative professionals do to get attention, the best image (public persona) for an artist isn’t some transparent marketing ploy that will get immediate and explosive media coverage.  Effective imaging for long-term career development emphasizes the true creative self – an artist’s inherent value - and subsequently downplays any distraction from that.”

"Aspiring recording artists should realize that, in this competitive music market, they must somehow meet at least one of three specific criteria if they are to be mass marketed by labels, publishers, agents, and managers:  What's the criteria? You have got to be either the FIRST TO do something, be the BEST AT doing something, or be DIFFERENT FROM everyone else in some way."

"The most important element in a burgeoning artist/manager relationship is time; it takes time to develop trust and to learn how to communicate with one another effectively."

"A healthy artist/artist manager relationship is a symbiotic one.  Each should do for the other what they cannot do for themselves in a business relationship that is not only mutually beneficial but also mutually dependent."

"A successful recording artist should require that his manager has been on many industry battlefields; and after having won those battles now brings a plethora of experiences and expertise to the decision-making table. To simply employ someone that you know and trust is not a strategic decision. It's a last resort."